Connecticut Safe Boating Study Guide


Chapter 5 Review—Navigation

Before proceeding to the quiz, take a moment to review some of the highlights from Chapter 5 - Navigation.

COLLISION AVOIDANCE RULES

Avoiding collisions involves precautionary measures, but more importantly, collision avoidance is made possible when boat operators know how to deal with situations appropriately. Boats in constant motion will meet quickly—take early and substantial action to avoid collisions and know what is expected of you in the following circumstances.

The boat which must keep clear of the other and alter its course is called the give-way vessel, whereas the vessel which has the right of way and must maintain its course and speed is referred to as the stand-on vessel.


OVERTAKING

The overtaking vessel A is the give-way vessel. The other vessel B is the stand-on vessel. As the give-way vessel, A must take EARLY and SUBSTANTIAL action to keep clear of the stand-on vessel B, while vessel B must maintain its course and speed.


CROSSING

In a situation where power-driven vessel A approaches the port side of power-driven B, vessel A is considered the give-way vessel. As the give-way vessel, A must take EARLY and SUBSTANTIAL action to keep clear and avoid crossing the stand-on vessel B. A must alter course to the starboard side.

*When encountering a sailing vessel a powerboat is always the give-way vessel.

ACTIONS FOR OPERATION IN DARKNESS

When encountering another vessel in darkness, or reduced visibility and...

  • Only a WHITE light is visible, you are overtaking another vessel and should give way to either side.
  • If RED, GREEN and WHITE lights are visible, you are approaching a powerboat head-on.
  • If only RED and GREEN lights are visible, you are approaching a sailboat head-on.
  • If RED, GREEN and WHITE lights are visible, you are approaching a powerboat head-on.
  • If only RED and GREEN lights are visible, you are approaching a sailboat head-on.

OPERATION IN RESTRICTED VISIBILITY

During periods of restricted visibility you should slow your speed to give your vessel an opportunity to maneuver should the risk of a collision arise.

It is also important to emit the proper sound signals while operating during periods of restricted visibility. For example:

To indicate its presence to other vessels a power driven vessel that is underway should emit 1 prolonged blast every 2 minutes.

Meanwhile, a sailing vessel that is underway should emit 1 prolonged blast along with two short blasts every 2 minutes.

Likewise a power driven vessel that is underway but not moving should emit 2 prolonged blasts every 2 minutes.

Any vessel that is anchored during periods of restricted visibility should indicate its presence with 5 seconds of rapid bell ringing every minute.

Lastly, any vessel that has run aground while visibility is restricted should sound 3 bell strokes followed by 5 seconds of rapid bell ringing and 3 more bell strokes every minute.