Connecticut Safe Boating Study Guide


Chapter 6 Review—Navigation

AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM (ATON)

GREEN LATERAL MARKER
RED LATERAL MARKER
RED & GREEN LATERAL MARKER

Should be kept on your left (port) side when proceeding in the upstream (returning from sea) direction.

Should be kept on your right (starboard) side when proceeding in the upstream (returning from sea) direction.

May be passed on either side when proceeding in the upstream direction. The main or preferred channel is indicated by the color of the topmost band.

The area located between a red and green lateral buoy is the navigable channel.

NUN BUOYS
CAN BUOYS
DAY MARKS

Red cone-shaped markers. Keep this marker on your right (starboard) side when proceeding in the upstream (returning from sea) direction.

Green cylindrical-shaped markers. Keep this marker on your left (port) side when proceeding in the upstream (returning from sea) direction.

Red triangles with even numbers are the equivalent of nun buoys (keep this marker on your right). Green squares with odd numbers are the equivalent of can buoys (keep this marker on your left side).

The numbers that are fixed below day-marks indicate the distance (in miles) to the river mouth.

THE UNIFORM STATE WATERWAYS MARKING SYSTEM


INFORMATION MARKERS (SQUARE)

Display information, such as localities, marinas campsites, etc.

CONTROL MARKER (CIRCLE)

Indicate speed limits, wash restrictions, etc.

KEEP-OUT MARKERS

Indicate areas where boats are prohibited.


OBSTRUCTION MARKERS

Indicate an obstruction to navigation. Do not pass between this marker and the shoreline.

MOORING MARKERS

Used for mooring or securing vessels.


SAFE-WATER MARKERS
DIVING MARKERS

Indicate safe water. This marker is used to indicate land falls, channel entrances or channel centers.

Indicate diving activity in the area.

DOCKING

Docking or mooring your vessel can be the most challenging of boating operations. Keep the following in mind for effective docking:

  • If the wind is in your face, you will need to approach the dock at a steep angle (30°-45°) and swing the boat quickly. Secure the bow first, and then reverse until the stern swings in.
  • If the wind is at your back, you should approach the dock at a shallow angle (10°-20°), then stop the boat and allow the wind to drift the boat into the dock.

ANCHORING

Though anchors are not required by federal law, it is advisable to carry an anchor for both recreational and emergency use.

As a general rule of thumb, your rode should be 7 to 10 times the depth of the water in which you will anchor. You will need more rode in bad weather or rough water.

Always secure the anchor line to a bow cleata metal fitting located on the bow on which a rope can be fastened.. Never tie the line to the stern as the additional weight could bring on water.