Canadian Safe Boating Course

Take the exam now!

Transport Canada has made changes to the online exam process and study guide. The old Boater Exam boating license course and test was discontinued on April 15th, 2011. Take the NEW Canadian Online Boating Course! The course material below remains as a resource for all who boat on Canadian waters—particularly experienced boaters who already have their Pleasure Craft Operator Card.


Pleasure Craft Terminology

Range Beacons:
A set of at least two markers placed a distance apart at various intervals permanently installed to form a transit and used to indicatea recommended track through dangerous or narrow waters.

Small craft warning:
Sustained wind speeds in the range of 20 to 33 knots inclusive as defined by Atmospheric Environment Service, Environment Canada.

Gale warning:
Sustained wind speeds in the range of 34 to 47 knots inclusive as defined by Atmospheric Environment Service, Environment Canada.

Storm warning:
Sustained wind speeds in the range of 48 to 63 knots inclusive as defined by Atmospheric Environment Service, Environment Canada.

Port:
The left side of a pleasure craft looking forward.

Hull:
The body of a pleasure craft exclusive of masts, sails, rigging, machinery and equipment.

Fenders:
Various devices serving to cushion the shocks and protect the side of a pleasure craft.

Pleasure craft:
A boat, a ship, a vessel, or any other description of water craft that is used exclusively for pleasure and does not carry passengers or goods for hire, reward, remuneration or any object of profit.

Ahead:
Direction or position pointing forward of a pleasure craft

Bow:
The forward part of a pleasure craft.

Underway:
A pleasure craft that is not at anchor or made fast to the shore.

Beam:
The width of a pleasure craft.

Power driven vessel:
Any vessel propelled by machinery as described in the Collision Regulations, rule 3.

Sailing vessel:
Any vessel under sail provided that propelling machinery, if fitted, is not being used.

Windward side:
The side opposite to that on which the mainsail is carried or, in the case of a square-rigged vessel, the side opposite to that on which the largest fore-and-aft sail is carried.

Code of signals Flag A:
The international diving flag (usually blue and white in colour) must be displayed by any vessel engaged in diving. A red and white flag carried on a buoy is used to mark areas where diving is in progress, although divers may stray from the boundaries of the marked areas. The Code of signals Flag A is regulated under the Private Buoy Regulations. When encountered the operator of a pleasure craft must keep well clear at slow speed.

Passive Radar Reflector:
Pleasure craft that are under 20 metres in length or a craft which is constructed primarily of non-metallic materials (wood or fiberglass), must be equipped with a passive radar reflector. The radar reflector must be mounted or suspended at a height of not less than 4 metres above the water if practicable. Unless: You only operate in limited traffic conditions, daylight, favourable environmental conditions and where compliance is not essential for the safety of the craft. OR: Unless the small size of the craft or operation of the craft away from radar navigation make compliance impracticable.

Wake:
The disturbed column of water around and behind a moving pleasure craft which is set into motion by the passage of a pleasure craft.

Wash:
The loose or broken water left behind a pleasure craft as it moves along and includes the water thrown aft by the propeller.

Abaft:
A direction toward the stern.

Astern:
A direction or position pointing behind a pleasure craft.

Draft:
The depth of water which a pleasure craft requires to float freely.

Light Winds:
Winds with speeds less than 12 knots as defined by Environment Canada.

Moderate Winds:
Wind speeds in the range of 12 to 19 knots as defined by Environment Canada.

Operator:
The person in effective charge and control of a pleasure craft and who is responsible for the pleasure craft.

Starboard:
The right side of a pleasure craft looking forward.

Stern:
The after part of a pleasure craft.

Strong Winds:
Sustained wind speeds in the range of 20 to 33 knots as defined by Environment Canada.



Bibliography

To enhance your boating safety and enjoyment, we recommend that you acquire and read the following publications:

Safe Boating Guide:
Published by Transport Canada (Office of Boating Safety)

Canada Shipping Act, Small Vessel Regulations:
Published by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Canada Shipping Act, Collision Regulations:
Published by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Canada Shipping Act, Boating Restriction Regulations:
Published by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans.

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