Georgia Boater Education Course


CHAPTER 6 REVIEW: On The Waterways

In this chapter, we finished learning about navigation and we also added some new skills to our repertoire, docking and anchoring.

AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM (ATON)

At the beginning of the chapter we learned about the Aids to Navigation System or ATON. This system uses red and green lateral markers, buoys and day markers to indicate safe navigable channels.

GREEN LATERAL MARKER

RED LATERAL MARKER

Keep on your left (port) side.

Keep on your right (starboard) side.

A handy rule of thumb that we learned was “Red. Right. Returning.” Which means, keep red markers on your right side when returning from sea. The upstream direction is the same as returning from sea.

A lateral marker that is both red and green can be passed on either side but have a preferred channel indicated by whichever color is on top.

We then learned about nun buoys, can buoys and day marks. Nun buoys are always red, can buoys are always green, and day marks are either red triangles or green squares. Again, the rule still applies: Red. Right. Returning.

NUN BUOYS

Red cone-shaped markers. Keep on your right (starboard) side when proceeding in the upstream (returning from sea) direction.

CAN BUOYS

Green cylindrical-shaped markers. Keep on your left (port) side when proceeding in the upstream (returning from sea) direction.

DAY-MARKERS

Keep red triangles with even numbers on your right, and green squares with odd numbers on your left side.

Remember, you can tell if you’re heading upstream or downstream by looking at the numbers on the markers. If the numbers are increasing, you are heading upstream.

And if you see a day marker with a number affixed below it, that number is a mile marker and indicates the distance in miles to the mouth of the river.

THE UNIFORM STATE WATERWAYS MARKING SYSTEM

Next we covered The Uniform State Waterways Marking System. This is a system of markers used to display important information to boaters.

We learned about four main types of markers:


INFORMATION MARKERS (SQUARE)

Displays information about local services

CONTROL MARKER (CIRCLE)

Indicates regulations and restrictions

KEEP-OUT MARKERS

Indicates areas off limits to boaters.


We then covered obstruction markers, mooring markers, safe-water markers and diving markers. Each have their own shape, color or pattern of lines and give important information. Remember a mooring marker is the only type of marker to which you can moor your boat, and a diving marker means you need to keep at least 100 feet distance, as there is diving activity in progress.


OBSTRUCTION MARKERS

Indicates an obstruction to navigation. Do not pass between this marker and the shoreline.

MOORING MARKERS

Used for mooring or securing vessels.


SAFE-WATER MARKERS
DIVING MARKERS

Indicates safe water. Used to indicate land falls, channel entrances or channel centers.

Indicates diving activity in the area.